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The Complete Guide to Residential Design Styles


Residential stylistic designs significantly influence every aspect of home construction and decoration, shaping both function and aesthetics. These designs evolve from cultural, historical, and technological contexts, and their reverberations can be felt in every corner of a dwelling.  In this chapter of the Urban Ambiance Learning Center, we will explore the 40 stylistics designs most influential in the United States, and which best represent the kaleidoscope of stylistic choices our lighting designers pursue with each of our fixtures.




The Americana Design Style


The Americana design style pays homage to the rich tapestry of American heritage, encompassing diverse periods and regional influences. Rooted in nostalgia, this style showcases elements like rustic barn doors, vintage quilts, and repurposed antiques. A color palette of red, white, and blue often features prominently, along with motifs such as stars and stripes. The materials used, like weathered wood and wrought iron, evoke a sense of history and simplicity. However, the Americana style just reference the country's past but celebrates its eclectic nature, blending various elements into a comfortable, cohesive, and uniquely American home environment.




Americana Style Architecture



Americana style residential architecture is a heartfelt nod to American history and heritage. Homes often take cues from various periods, including Colonial, Federal, and Craftsman, resulting in structures that resonate with historical authenticity. This architecture encapsulates the nation's spirit, marrying functionality with a deep-seated reverence for the past.

  • Gabled roofs and wraparound porches are signature features of Americana homes.

  • Traditional materials like clapboard, brick, and stone define exterior facades.

  • Barn-style doors and shutters evoke a rustic, country charm.

  • Interiors often incorporate repurposed antiques, celebrating history and sustainability.

  • The design draws inspiration from various American architectural periods, blending them seamlessly.


Americana Materials



Rooted in nostalgia and simplicity, the primary materials of American design include weathered wood reminiscent of barns and farmhouses. Wrought iron, often seen in hardware and fixtures, adds rustic charm. Natural textiles, such as cotton and wool, feature prominently in upholstery and decor, while brick and stone, used in both interiors and exteriors, provide a sturdy, timeless foundation.

  • Weathered wood is a staple, echoing barns and historical structures.

  • Wrought iron details add authenticity and rustic flair.

  • Natural textiles, like cotton and wool, are favorites for upholstery and decor.

  • Brick and stone form robust, ageless foundations in Americana design.

  • Repurposed antiques are central, celebrating history and sustainability.


Americana Colors and Finishes



Predominant colors include deep reds, blues, and whites, reminiscent of the American flag. Meanwhile, earthy tones like browns, tans, and creams underline its rustic essence.  Antique finishes, especially on wooden furniture, add depth and character. Textiles often showcase vintage patterns and motifs, further enhancing the nostalgic ambiance of the style.

  • Deep reds, blues, and whites dominate, echoing the American flag.

  • Earthy tones, including browns and tans, enhance the rustic vibe.

  • Matte and distressed finishes are preferred for their aged appearance.

  • Antique finishes on wood imbue spaces with historical depth.

  • Vintage patterns and motifs in textiles further define Americana's nostalgic essence.


Americana Furniture and Decor



In essence, Americana design weaves threads of nostalgia, celebrating the nation's journey and the stories of its people through the medium of home interiors. Furniture items often feature sturdy, simplistic constructions reminiscent of early colonial and farmhouse styles. Weathered wood, handcrafted details, and repurposed antiques are central to the Americana aesthetic. Decorative items, such as vintage quilts, folk art, and patriotic motifs, punctuate interiors with a sense of history and place.

  • Sturdy, simplistic furniture echoes colonial and farmhouse origins.

  • Weathered wood and handcrafted details dominate Americana furnishings.

  • Repurposed antiques add both functionality and historical resonance.

  • Vintage quilts and folk art serve as quintessential decorative elements.

  • Patriotic motifs, from stars to stripes, are frequently showcased in the decor.


Americana Lighting



Americana design lighting fixtures are an ode to simpler times, marrying functionality with understated beauty. These fixtures often draw from colonial, farmhouse, and rustic inspirations. Lantern-style pendants, evoking the early days of American history, are a staple. Chandeliers or sconces with weathered finishes add a touch of rustic charm. Table lamps might feature bases resembling antiques.  The point is to embrace the country's heritage, illuminating your home with warmth and historical resonance.

  • Lantern-style pendants are emblematic of early American history.

  • Wrought iron finishes exude rustic elegance.

  • Table lamps often incorporate antique designs or Americana motifs.

  • Mason jar lights reflect the style's grassroots charm.

  • Candle-inspired fixtures provide a nod to pre-electricity eras.




The American Bungalow Design Style


The American bungalow, though wildly popular, was not always American but was adopted from India in the mid-19th century, where the British built them as simple one-story rest houses for travelers. Unlike other design styles that tend to obey the same rules wherever they are seen, this style conforms to particular communities. For example, Bungalows in California have Spanish touches, in New England, they have British characteristics, and in communities with Dutch roots, they may have gambrel roofs. However, there are staple characteristics that define the American bungalow design style.




American Bungalow Style Architecture



American-bungalow structures showcase their build design very prominently –almost as if they are communicating the original builders' carpentry and design skills. They are also big on maintaining curb appeal on the exterior and, for that reason, will opt for a clean, manicured appearance. The interiors, on the other hand, have finer details. Here are more details:

  • Low-pitched roofs that have eaves or gables.

  • Large front porches shielded from the wind and rain.

  • Expansive fireplaces with built-in cabinets, shelving, and seating for homeowners who love the cabin feel.

  • Exposed rafters that extend outward and may be cut for personal style.

  • Dormers in the front with a gable or shed roof.

  • Double-hung windows with large single glass panes.



American Bungalow Materials



Materials for this style seek to provide a 'home sweet home' feel. They focus on warmth and a casual appeal and steer away from complicated textures. Different regions also tend to have their favorites. For instance, the West loves stucco and clay-tiled roofs. However, the following materials are common in American-bungalow style homes:

  • Clapboard sidings with cedar shingles often with stained wood or another earthy tone

  • Stone, brick, or concrete blocks molded into a decorative form.

  • Accessories made of clay, glass, and wood or unique picks from flea markets to make the space inviting.

  • Rustic, organic designs in seating and furniture achieved with bamboo, wood, grass, and handwoven wicker.



American Bungalow Colors and Finishes



Warmth, giving a cozy, and inviting feel is the underlying theme that dictates the color palette for this style. Exteriors may keep off the traditional brown and white for turquoise, gray-green, or butter yellow. Rugs may be patterned or stick to subdued hues. 

  • Accent walls may be light brown or create a contrast in an earthy-toned room with mustard yellow, sage green, or terra cotta orange.

  • White, soft browns, and shades of blue are excellent color combinations for house exteriors.

  • Woodwork, furniture, moldings, and trim often have a natural finish or are stained to enhance the wood's color.

  • Upholstery and furniture are in shades of beige -khaki, mocha, tan, etc. –to keep the space warm.

  • Metals in gold, chrome, black, brass, silver, and bronze finishes are also common.



American Bungalow Furniture and Decor



American bungalow favors streamlined furniture often made from heavy oak with a dark wood finish. Exposed frames are also common to display the details of their make. Slats, couch arms, and comfortable backs are also common. Here's more:

  • Period furniture depending on the personal taste. Most of them are pieces passed down in a family or unique collectibles bought from a flea market.

  • Large wooden beds with bedposts, storage boxes in the bedroom, and ornate corner tables and seating in the living room

  • Furnished loveseats under windows and sofas for lounging in the living room or on a shielded porch.

  • Decorations come from different cultures, including souvenirs from travel escapades –Moroccan wallpaper, Arabian lamps, wall hangings with tribal drawings, etc.

  • Other wall decorations include murals, or texturing the walls by sponging, ragging, dragging, and stippling.



American Bungalow Lighting



When choosing lighting, most homeowners with an American-bungalow-style home try to mimic their grid windows and geometric or angular arts and crafts designs. It's common to find oil-rubbed finishes with copper or bronze undertones to keep up with this theme in their lighting. Also, large mirrors framed with oak wood may be used to reflect natural daylight in small rooms. Here's more:

  • Lighting may play between subtle and bold.  Large chandeliers light up living and dining rooms.  Lamps are common in bedrooms.

  • Fixtures with a bronze or antique black metal shades.

  • Angular chandeliers or fixtures with square elements 

  • Ceiling fixtures are used in almost every room.




The Art Deco Design Style


Art Deco design, rooted in the flamboyant 1920s and '30s, is an embodiment of luxury, modernity, and bold artistic expression. This design movement was a departure from the ornate Art Nouveau that preceded it, leaning instead towards sleek lines, geometric patterns, and symmetrical forms. The architecture of Art Deco homes often boasted curved facades, fluted pillars, and zigzagged motifs. Interiors were equally striking, with high contrast color schemes, such as black and gold or deep teal and silver.  Art Deco design wasn't just about aesthetics; it was about creating an environment that was simultaneously cutting-edge and comfortable, blending the best of the modern age with undeniable glamour.






Art Deco Architecture



Art Deco residential architecture is celebrated for its sleek geometric designs and ornate embellishments. This style captures an era of innovation and glamour in home design.

  • Streamlined forms and symmetry define Art Deco homes.

  • Facades frequently feature curved corners, zigzags, and sunburst motifs.

  • Materials like chrome, glass, and terracotta add luxurious touches.

  • Strong vertical lines and flat roofs emphasize the modern aesthetic.

  • Stylized motifs, often drawing from global inspirations, enrich architectural details.



Art Deco Materials



Materials played a pivotal role in achieving the characteristic opulence of Art Deco design. Exotic woods like ebony and zebrawood were prevalent, chosen for their rich textures and colors. Stone work was equally exotic, often showcasing immense slabs of heavily veined marbles.  Metals, especially chrome, brass, and stainless steel, introduced a sleek, contemporary dimension, often juxtaposed with the shimmer of glass or mirrored surfaces.

  • Exotic woods, particularly ebony and zebrawood, lent warmth and luxury to Art Deco pieces.

  • Sleek metals like chrome and brass introduced a contemporary flair to designs.

  • Glass and mirrored surfaces were pivotal, reflecting opulence and sophistication.

  • Lacquered finishes and intricate inlays were synonymous with the era's attention to detail.



Art Deco Colors and Finishes



The colors of Art Deco design lean towards juxtaposed hues where soft pastels may be boldly contrasted with deep teals, radiant golds, rich burgundies, and striking blacks. Metallic finishes in gold, silver, and chrome add a touch of modernity, while lacquered surfaces provide a high-gloss, polished look.

  • Pastels contrasted with bold colors or striking blacks

  • Metallic finishes, particularly gold, silver, and chrome

  • Lacquered surfaces, offering a glossy, refined appearance.

  • Mirrored accents and sunburst motifs are signature elements in designs.

  • Exotic materials, such as rare woods and intricate inlays, heighten the style's opulence.



Art Deco Furniture and Decor



Art Deco furniture often showcases streamlined forms with symmetrical designs, crafted from rich woods or plush fabrics and accented with exotic veneers. Bold geometric patterns,  dramatic curvy shapes, and vibrant fabrics define the era's furnishings. Decor items, from mirrors with sunburst motifs to sleek chrome light fixtures, add to the avant-garde design. 

  • Streamlined forms and symmetrical designs are hallmarks of Art Deco furniture.

  • Exotic veneers

  • Geometric patterns and angular shapes feature prominently in both furniture and fabric designs.

  • Decor items often showcase sunburst motifs and gold and chrome accents, reflecting the era's glamour.

  • Craftsmanship was paramount, combining traditional skills with innovative aesthetics.



Art Deco Lighting



Often crafted from sleek materials like chrome, glass, and brass, these fixtures typically feature geometric shapes, layered designs, and frosted or stained glass.  Chandeliers drip with opulence, boasting intricate detailing and bold, angular silhouettes. Wall sconces, with stylized motifs and streamlined forms, illuminate interiors with a sophisticated ambiance, making the space feel cinematic.

  • Sleek metal finishes like chrome, golds, blacks, and glass are staples in Art Deco lighting designs.

  • Geometric shapes and layered designs typify lamps and fixtures.

  • Tiered profiles are iconic of this design.

  • Chandeliers showcase opulence with intricate detailing and bold silhouettes.

  • Interior wall sconces add a touch of elegance to interiors.





The Bohemian Design Style


Bohemian design style, often referred to simply as "Boho," is a vibrant and eclectic approach to residential interior design that celebrates individuality, global influences, and artistic expression. Rooted in the free-spirited ethos of the bohemians — artists, writers, and unconventional thinkers of the late 19th and early 20th centuries — Boho design is characterized by its disregard for strict rules, embracing a mix of colors, patterns, and textures.


Boho spaces are deeply personal, often evolving over time. They tell the stories of their inhabitants, capturing their passions, travels, and experiences. This design style is less about following trends and more about creating a timeless space that resonates with the soul.



Bohemian Style Architecture



Bohemian architecture blends various global influences to create a unique and personal aesthetic. Often, Bohemian architectural spaces may lean toward older, rustic structures, such as cottages or lofts, that carry an inherent character. Exposed beams, arched doorways, and mismatched windows might prevail. Outdoor spaces may be seamlessly integrated, blurring the lines between indoor and outdoor living.

  • Bohemian architecture blends diverse global influences.

  • Older, character-rich structures like cottages or lofts are favored.

  • Exposed beams and raw materials showcase a structure's authenticity.

  • Arched doorways and non-uniform windows are common features.

  • Indoor and outdoor spaces merge, emphasizing a holistic living experience.



Bohemian Style Materials



Materials commonly used in Bohemian designs include natural textiles like cotton, linen, and silk. Rich velvets and brocades can also be found, juxtaposed with rustic materials like burlap and hemp. Vintage fabrics, often with ethnic or floral patterns, play a crucial role. Wood, especially in its raw or distressed form, is a preferred choice for furniture. Additionally, woven materials, like rattan and bamboo, add texture and depth.

  • Bohemian designs favor natural textiles such as cotton, linen, and silk.

  • Rich velvets and brocades often feature prominently in Boho interiors.

  • Rustic materials, including burlap and hemp, provide an earthy touch.

  • Vintage fabrics, showcasing ethnic or floral motifs, are frequently incorporated.



Bohemian Style Colors and Finishes



Warm shades of terracotta, deep browns, and olive greens frequently lay the foundation of the Bohemian style. These are accented with pops of turquoise, magenta, and golden yellow. Multiple colors are layered to create an effortlessly eclectic ambiance. Distressed or matte finishes often dominate to give a worn, lived-in look. Moreover, touches of shimmer, whether as metallic accents or sequined textiles, add depth and interest.

  • Earthy tones like terracotta, deep browns, and olive greens are foundational in Bohemian color schemes.

  • Bright accents, including turquoise, magenta, and golden yellow, vivify the design.

  • The Bohemian palette confidently layers multiple colors, ensuring an eclectic blend.

  • Distressed or matte finishes are prevalent, lending a vintage and lived-in feel.

  • Occasional shimmer, through metallics or sequins, punctuates the Boho look with unexpected shine.



Bohemian Style Furniture and Decor



Furniture pieces in boho settings tend to have a vintage, or antique, feel. Low-lying furniture, such as floor cushions and poufs, invite relaxed lounging. Textured elements like macramé wall hangings, patterned rugs, and tasseled throws abound. Open shelving filled with a collection of global trinkets, plants, and books also embodies the free-spirited nature of the style. Bohemian decor exploits the unexpected - fusing together items from various cultures, eras, and design philosophies.

  • Bohemian furniture often exudes a vintage or antique character.

  • Low-lying furniture pieces, like floor cushions and poufs, promote a laid-back atmosphere.

  • Textural decor elements, including macramé and tasseled throws, are hallmarks of Boho style.

  • Open shelving showcases an eclectic mix of trinkets, plants, and literature.

  • The Boho decor approach celebrates the fusion of diverse cultures, eras, and design philosophies.



Bohemian Style Lighting



Lighting in Bohemian designs is an essential element that evokes warmth, intimacy, and artistic flair. Ambient, soft-glowing lights often set the mood, with lanterns, fairy lights, and candles creating a dreamy atmosphere. Hanging pendants made of natural materials like rattan or macramé, and intricate metal chandeliers with an antique finish, are popular choices. Floor and table lamps, draped with vintage textiles or adorned with beading, add personality and character.

  • Ambient lighting, including lanterns and fairy lights, infuses a dreamy, warm ambiance.

  • Hanging pendants crafted from natural materials, like rattan or macramé, are quintessential Boho fixtures.

  • Metal chandeliers with antique finishes enhance the vintage vibe of the space.

  • Floor and table lamps often feature decorative elements like vintage textiles or beading.

  • Colored or stained-glass fixtures introduce whimsy and a touch of historic nostalgia.





The Casual Design Style


Casual design style in residential interior design emphasizes comfort, relaxation, and a welcoming ambiance. Often viewed as the antithesis of formal, stuffy interiors, casual design champions the lived-in look. It's the embodiment of an environment where shoes are kicked off, laughs are shared, and memories are made. 

In essence, casual design resonates with homeowners who want their space to be a reflection of their lives – unpretentious, inviting, and replete with personal touches that make a house truly feel like a home.


Casual Style Architecture



Casual design architecture often embody a sense of warmth and approachability. Pitched roofs, expansive windows, and open floor plans are common, inviting natural light and fostering connection between spaces. Exteriors may feature wood or stone while the interior boasts exposed beams, fireplaces, and built-in shelves. The overall intention in casual architecture is to craft a space that facilitates ease, flow, and the simple joys of daily living.

  • Casual architecture prioritizes functionality, comfort, and an unpretentious aesthetic.

  • Pitched roofs, expansive windows, and open floor plans create a welcoming environment.

  • Natural materials like wood and stone are often used, aligning the home with nature.

  • Interior details such as exposed beams, fireplaces, and built-ins contribute to the homey feel.

  • The design encourages ease, flow, and the celebration of everyday moments.


Casual Style Materials



Woods, in their various tones and finishes, are staples, whether for flooring, cabinetry, or furniture. Soft, breathable textiles like cotton and linen grace upholstery, curtains, and throws. Stone, either as countertops or fireplace surrounds, adds texture and an earthy feel. Wicker and rattan may make appearances in furnishings, bringing in a tactile, organic touch. Lastly, metal accents, particularly in aged or brushed finishes, impart subtle hints of industrial charm in the relaxed ambiance.

  • Woods are fundamental in casual design, used in furniture, flooring, and cabinetry.

  • Breathable textiles like cotton and linen enhance the comfort and airiness of spaces.

  • Stone elements introduce texture and an earthy, grounded presence.

  • Wicker and rattan furnishings add an organic, tactile dimension to the decor.

  • Metal accents, especially in aged or brushed finishes, provide a balanced, slightly industrial touch.


Casual Style Colors and Finishes



Soft beiges, creams, muted blues, and gentle greens often serve as the base. However, the design doesn't shy away from integrating subtle pops of warmer or brighter hues, especially through accents. The finishes in casual interiors are typically matte or subtly distressed, echoing the unpretentious vibe of the style. Wood finishes, for instance, might appear naturally weathered or lightly whitewashed.

  • A neutral palette, featuring beiges, creams, and soft blues, dominates casual designs.

  • Subtle pops of color can be introduced through accents for added warmth.

  • Matte finishes underscore the relaxed and understated appeal of the style.

  • Distressed or weathered elements, especially in wood, add character and depth.

  • The color and finish choices aim for an accessible, timeless, and homey atmosphere.


Casual Style Furniture and Decor



Casual furniture and decor underscore comfort and functionality while evoking a welcoming, homey vibe. Furniture pieces, often with soft lines and rounded edges, prioritize comfort — think plush sofas, cushioned armchairs, and functional coffee tables. The fabrics used are typically soft and breathable, inviting relaxation. Decor is understated, with an emphasis on personal touches like family photos, travel mementos, or cherished books. Shelves might display a mix of decorative pieces and practical items, reflecting the homeowner's personal journey. 

  • Casual furniture is characterized by soft lines, rounded edges, and a focus on comfort.

  • Fabrics in casual designs are soft, breathable, and inviting, enhancing the comfort factor.

  • Personal touches, like family photos and mementos, are central to casual decor.

  • Decorative and practical items often share space, reflecting a genuine lived-in atmosphere.

  • The overarching aim is to craft spaces that feel both personal and universally welcoming.


Casual Style Lighting



Casual lighting fixtures prioritize functionality while enhancing a relaxed, inviting ambiance of the space. Ambient lighting, often sourced from recessed lights or flush-mount fixtures, ensures rooms are well-lit without being overpowering. Pendant lights, often in muted tones or natural materials, can hang over dining tables or kitchen islands. Table and floor lamps with fabric shades bring warmth to corners and reading nooks. The use of lanterns or candleholders adds a touch of cozy, diffused lighting.

  • Ambient lighting from recessed or flush-mount fixtures provides a soft, general illumination.

  • Pendant lights, especially in natural materials, accent dining or kitchen areas

  • Table and floor lamps with fabric shades contribute to the cozy ambiance.

  • Lanterns and candleholders offer additional layers of warm, diffused light.

  • Casual lighting fixtures balance functionality with understated decorative elements.




The Classic Design Style


The Classic design style in residential interior design epitomizes timelessness, elegance, and symmetry. Rooted in European sensibilities, it draws inspiration from ancient Greek, Roman, and Renaissance architecture and decor. The hallmark of the classic style is its emphasis on proportion and balance, ensuring every element harmonizes with its surroundings.

While classic design tends to be more formal and structured than some contemporary styles, it’s not stiff or unapproachable. Instead, it provides a sense of stability, longevity, and an undying appreciation for beauty and craftsmanship, making homes feel both grand and inviting.


Classic Style Architecture



Classic architecture often draws inspiration from historical periods, particularly Greek, Roman, and Renaissance architecture. The facades typically showcase grand columns, intricate cornices, and detailed moldings. Windows are often evenly spaced and adorned with shutters or decorative trims. Interiors might feature high ceilings, archways, and coffered detailing. Throughout, there's a consistent emphasis on proportion and order, resulting in homes that feel both majestic and timeless.

  • Classic architecture is rooted in Greek, Roman, and Renaissance influences.

  • Symmetry and balance are paramount, both in exterior facades and interior layouts.

  • Grand columns, intricate cornices, and detailed moldings exemplify the style's refined aesthetics.

  • Evenly spaced windows, often adorned with shutters or trims, contribute to the architectural harmony.

  • High ceilings, archways, and coffered details enhance the interior's grandeur.



Classic Style Materials



Hardwoods, such as oak and mahogany, define furniture and flooring, prized for their intricate grains and durability. Marble, with its luxurious veining, might grace countertops, fireplaces, or flooring. Metals, especially gold, silver, and brass, appear in fixtures, hardware, and decorative accents. Silks, velvets, and brocades, known for their opulent textures, adorn upholstery and draperies. The choice of materials in classic design reflects a dedication to quality, tradition, and an appreciation for craftsmanship.

  • Hardwoods like oak and mahogany are staples for furniture and flooring due to their durability.

  • Marble is a favored choice for its elegance, often seen in countertops and fireplaces.

  • Metals, particularly gold, silver, and brass, elevate fixtures and decorative accents.

  • Luxurious textiles, including silks, velvets, and brocades, are prominent in upholstery and drapes.

  • The materials in classic design underscore a commitment to tradition and high-quality craftsmanship.



Classic Style Colors and Finishes



Neutral shades, such as creams, beiges, and soft grays, form the foundational hues, creating a serene backdrop. Richer tones like navy, burgundy, or forest green accent these to lend depth and grandeur. Polished and glossed finishes, especially in woodwork, are prevalent. Gold or silver leaf accentuate moldings or furniture details. Wall treatments, such as wainscoting or ornate wallpapers, often have matte finishes, contrasting the glossy elements for a balanced, opulent environment.

  • A sophisticated palette of neutrals like creams, beiges, and grays dominate Classic design.

  • Richer tones, such as navy or burgundy, add depth and accentuation to spaces.

  • Polished or glossed finishes, particularly in woodwork, evoke a sense of grandeur.

  • Gold or silver leaf applications highlight intricate architectural or furniture details.

  • Matte finishes on wall treatments provide a balanced contrast to the glossier elements.



Classic Style Furniture and Decor



Pieces are often substantial, crafted from quality hardwoods and showcasing intricate carvings or marquetry. Upholstery, in luxurious fabrics like velvet or brocade, boasts tufted detailing or nailhead trims. Decor elements are selected with a discerning eye — think crystal chandeliers, ornate mirrors, and grand clocks. Art pieces often have historical or traditional motifs. Every item is chosen for its aesthetic appeal, luxury, and tradition.

  • Furniture in classic design is substantial, emphasizing quality hardwoods and intricate details.

  • Luxurious fabrics like velvet and brocade adorn upholstery, often with tufted or nailhead accents.

  • Decorative elements, such as crystal chandeliers and ornate mirrors, amplify the style's opulence.

  • Art and decorative items frequently reference historical or traditional motifs.

  • The overall decor narrative centers on luxury, tradition, and enduring elegance.



Classic Style Lighting



Grand crystal chandeliers, often the focal points of rooms, exude opulence and diffuse soft light. Wall sconces flank mirrors or artwork, adding layers of illumination. Candelabras introduce a touch of historical charm. Table and floor lamps often feature intricate bases with fabric-shaded tops. The choice of lighting fixtures in classic interiors mirrors the overarching theme of the style: grandeur, tradition, and meticulous attention to detail.

  • Grand crystal chandeliers serve as opulent focal points in classic interiors.

  • Ornate wall sconces, typically in brass or gold, provide layered lighting.

  • Candelabras introduce historical charm and ambiance to spaces.

  • Table and floor lamps in classic designs often boast intricate bases and fabric shades.

  • Every lighting choice reflects the classic theme of grandeur, tradition, and meticulous craftsmanship.





The Coastal Design Style


The Coastal design style, often termed "beachy" or "nautical," draws inspiration from the sea, sand, and sky to evoke a serene and airy ambiance in residential spaces. This style is characterized by its light, breezy aesthetic, intending to recreate the relaxed vibe of a beachside retreat, regardless of the home's actual proximity to the coast.

Natural light is a defining element of the Coastal style, with homes often featuring large windows, sheer curtains, or sliding doors that allow sunlight to flood the interiors. Decor accents like seashells, coral, or maritime-themed artwork further emphasize the beach-inspired aesthetic. The result is an environment that feels refreshing, open, and inherently tranquil, offering residents an escape to the seaside, even if only in spirit.


Coastal Style Architecture



Coastal architecture embodies the spirit of life by the sea The design features wide, expansive windows and often includes large porches or decks to capitalize on ocean vistas. Pitched roofs, sometimes with shingles, offer an aesthetic appeal and assist in shedding rain. Simple, clean lines characterize coastal homes, reflecting the unpretentiousness of beach life. 

  • Coastal architecture often features raised foundations for protection against flooding.

  • Expansive windows and open layouts maximize views and natural light.

  • Large porches or decks are common, enhancing outdoor living and ocean vistas.

  • Pitched roofs, frequently with shingles, combine aesthetics with functionality for coastal conditions.

  • The architectural style boasts simple, clean lines, mirroring the relaxed essence of the beach.



Coastal Style Materials



Coastal design champions the use of natural, durable materials. Hardwood, weathered or whitewashed, is prevalent in flooring and furniture while Driftwood make decorative furnishings.. Natural fibers like jute, seagrass, and rattan are incorporated into rugs, furniture, or accent pieces. Linen and cotton, often in light shades, are favorite choices for upholstery and drapery due to their breathable nature. Stone, reminiscent of beach pebbles or coastal cliffs, can be integrated into countertops or fireplace surrounds.

  • Weathered or whitewashed hardwood is a staple for flooring and furniture.

  • Driftwood is often repurposed for decor and furnishing accents.

  • Natural fibers like jute and rattan introduce texture and organic charm.

  • Breathable fabrics, such as linen and cotton, are preferred for upholstery and curtains.



Coastal Style Colors and Finishes



Whites and soft neutrals lay the foundation, evoking the color of sandy beaches and sun-bleached driftwood. Shades of blue, from pale aqua to deeper navy, reflect the ocean's expanse, while gentle grays mirror the coastal fog. Common finishes are matte and distressed, with whitewashed or weathered wood symbolizing timeworn seaside structures. Natural fabrics may have a slightly faded appearance, suggesting the gentle wear from sun and salt.

  • Coastal palettes are dominated by whites, soft neutrals, and varying shades of blue.

  • Gentle grays in the mix reflect coastal mists and overcast skies.

  • Matte and distressed finishes evoke the timeworn charm of seaside living.

  • Whitewashed or weathered wood is a signature finish, reminiscent of sun-bleached structures.

  • Natural fabrics often exhibit a sun and salt-faded appearance, enhancing the style's authenticity.



Coastal Style Furniture and Decor



Coastal furniture pieces are mostly crafted from light-toned woods, often in weathered or whitewashed finish. Comfortable oversized sofas and plush chairs are upholstered in natural, breathable fabrics. Wicker and rattan pieces add texture and a casual feel. Decor is understated yet evocative of the sea — think seashells, coral sculptures, maritime-themed artwork, and driftwood accents. Soft, airy textiles, like linen curtains or jute rugs, complement the design.

  • Furniture in Coastal design favors light-toned, weathered woods, reflecting the beach environment.

  • Comfort is paramount, with oversized seating upholstered in breathable fabrics.

  • Wicker and rattan furnishings introduce texture and a laid-back aesthetic.

  • Seashells, driftwood, and maritime-themed decor emphasize the connection to the sea.

  • Airy textiles like linen and jute round out the relaxed, beachy ambiance.



Coastal Style Lighting



Coastal lighting fixtures often incorporate natural materials in the form of rope-wrapped pendants or driftwood-accented chandeliers. Glass lanterns or clear pendant lights can evoke the feel of floating bubbles or vintage ship bottles. Simplicity is key, so many fixtures lean towards minimalist designs, allowing the natural beauty of the materials to shine. Table and floor lamps might feature bases crafted from ceramics, shells, or bleached wood, often paired with neutral or subtly patterned shades.

  • Coastal lighting often features natural materials like rope or driftwood.

  • Glass lanterns and clear pendant lights mirror the clarity of seaside environments.

  • The design of fixtures leans minimalist, emphasizing the material's intrinsic beauty.

  • Lamps often showcase bases made of ceramics, shells, or bleached wood.

  • Neutral shades on lamps reinforce the soft, beach-inspired palette of coastal design.





The Colonial Design Style


The Colonial design style is deeply rooted in American history, drawing inspiration from the early settlers and the architectural and design elements they introduced. Originating in the 17th century, Colonial style offers a glimpse into the early days of the United States, showcasing a blend of European influences, primarily British, Dutch, and Spanish. 

In residential interior design, Colonial interiors are characterized by their symmetry, simplicity, and functionality. Rooms typically have a central focal point, like a fireplace, with furniture arranged in a balanced manner on either side. A muted, earthy color palette defines Colonial interiors while furniture is sturdy and functional, crafted from local woods with characteristic details. Moldings and woodwork are prominent features in many Colonial homes. 

Overall, the Colonial design style presents a harmonious blend of form and function, offering a nostalgic nod to America's rich past.


Colonial Style Architecture



Colonial structures, largely influenced by European designs, are marked by their symmetry and rectangular shapes. Central entrances with brick or wood facades are common, flanked by evenly spaced windows. Steep, gabled roofs, often with dormer windows, are a characteristic feature. Multi-pane, double-hung windows and brick chimneys are also emblematic of this style. Inside, rooms are typically organized around a central hallway.

  • Colonial architecture is characterized by its distinct symmetry and rectangular form.

  • Central entrances are a hallmark, often leading to a central hallway inside.

  • Steep, gabled roofs with dormer windows are frequently seen in Colonial homes.

  • Multi-pane, double-hung windows and brick chimneys are defining architectural features.

  • The design reflects a blend of European influences tailored to early American needs and materials.



Colonial Style Materials



Hardwoods like oak, pine, and cherry were central to crafting furniture, floors, and architectural details. Brick was commonly used for facades, chimneys, and fireplaces. Local stones provided a sturdy foundation for homes and also made appearances in walls or pathways. Wrought iron was used for hardware, like door handles, hinges, and light fixtures. Handmade textiles, including wool and cotton, adorned interiors in the form of rugs, curtains, and upholstery.

  • Hardwoods, such as oak and cherry, were foundational for furniture and flooring.

  • Brick was a favored material for facades, chimneys, and interior fireplaces.

  • Local stone was used for home foundations, walls, and pathways.

  • Wrought iron played a significant role in hardware and fixtures.



Colonial Style Colors and Finishes



Earthy tones, such as deep greens, rich reds, and navy blues, are prevalent. They come paired with muted neutrals like creams, tans, and soft grays. The matte finish or subdued sheens reflect the natural and handcrafted nature of the era. Wooden furniture and floors often have a hand-rubbed or aged appearance, while metals, particularly wrought iron, exhibit an oxidized, weathered look. Textiles, predominantly handmade, possess a rustic texture.

  • Colonial colors are inspired by natural surroundings, featuring earthy tones and muted neutrals.

  • Deep greens, rich reds, and navy blues are signature hues of the style.

  • Finishes tend towards matte or subdued sheens, reflecting the era's handcrafted ethos.

  • Wooden elements often showcase hand-rubbed or aged finishes.

  • Wrought iron and other metals display a characteristic weathered appearance.



Colonial Style Furniture and Decor



Crafted primarily from local hardwoods like oak and cherry, pieces are sturdy with simple, clean lines.  Spindle legs, ladder-backs, and dough boxes are common design elements. Decor is sparse but meaningful. Pewter dishes, wooden bowls, brass candlesticks, and hand-stitched samplers are typical adornments. Fireplaces, both functional and aesthetic, often serve as the focal point of rooms, adorned with iron tools and Delft tiles or brickwork.

  • Colonial furniture is crafted from local hardwoods, emphasizing durability and simplicity.

  • High-backed chairs, canopy beds, and trestle tables are iconic pieces of the style.

  • Design details like spindle legs and ladder-backs are prevalent in furniture items.

  • Pewter, brass, and wood dominate the decor, with items like dishes, candlesticks, and wooden bowls.

  • Fireplaces, adorned with iron tools and decorative tiles, are central to room design and function.



Colonial Style Lighting



Colonial lighting fixtures echo the era's simplicity and utilitarianism. Candles were primary light sources, leading to the popularity of brass or pewter candlesticks and wall-mounted sconces. Later, lantern-style fixtures made from metals like iron and tin became common. Wrought iron chandeliers showcased minimalist designs with candelabra-style arms. Whale oil lamps with glass or ceramic bases also made appearances in Colonial homes.

  • Candles were primary light sources, accentuated by brass or pewter candlesticks and sconces.

  • Lantern-style fixtures crafted from iron or tin became emblematic of the Colonial era.

  • Clear or seeded glass panes were typical in lantern designs.

  • Wrought iron chandeliers with candelabra arms added overhead illumination.

  • Whale oil lamps with decorative bases served as early portable lighting solutions.





The Contemporary Design Style


Contemporary interior design is fluid - reflecting what is current and evolving. Unlike static styles anchored in a specific era, contemporary design is a reflection of the present moment, which means its elements keep changing. At its core, it's characterized by clean lines, simplicity, and a focus on function over form.

Neutral color palettes of blacks, whites, grays, and tans are often punctuated with bold, vibrant accents. Materials are diverse, ranging from natural wood and stone to industrial glass, steel, and chrome. Open floor plans and large windows that let in natural light are emphasized. Innovative and efficient lighting solutions, often employing LED technology, further define these spaces.

In essence, contemporary design showcases the spirit of the times, embodying modern simplicity, functionality, and a harmonious blend of materials and technology.


Contemporary Style Architecture



Contemporary architecture is a celebration of the modern ethos, prioritizing clean lines, geometric forms, and functional spaces. The designs often reject superfluous ornamentation in favor of simplicity and clarity. Large, expansive windows are a hallmark, allowing for ample natural light and fostering a connection with the outdoors. Open floor plans are common, breaking away from traditional compartmentalized layouts. 

  • Contemporary architecture emphasizes clean lines and geometric forms.

  • A rejection of excessive ornamentation defines the style, championing simplicity.

  • Expansive windows are a defining feature, maximizing natural light and outdoor connectivity.

  • Open floor plans promote fluidity and connectivity between living spaces.

  • A mix of natural and industrial materials showcases the balance of nature and modernity.


Contemporary Style Materials



Natural wood and stone are frequently employed. Concrete, often seen in flooring or walls, adds an industrial touch with its cool, smooth surface. Glass is used extensively in large windows, partitions, and furniture. Steel and chrome define fixtures, railings, and furniture accents, lending a sleek, modern aesthetic. The juxtaposition of these materials—rustic against refined, warm against cool—creates a dynamic balance within contemporary spaces.

  • Wood and stone introduce warmth and organic texture to contemporary designs.

  • Concrete, with its industrial vibe, is commonly used for floors and architectural elements.

  • Glass plays a prominent role, especially in windows and partitions, promoting transparency and light.

  • Steel and chrome feature in various fixtures, offering a modern, polished look.

  • The harmonious blending of diverse materials defines the rich tapestry of contemporary aesthetics.


Contemporary Style Colors and Finishes



Contemporary design embraces a color palette that is predominantly neutral, with shades like white, gray, black, and beige taking center stage. However, splashes of bold and vibrant colors are often used to create dynamic focal points. Sleek and polished finishes prevail, with high-gloss cabinetry, matte concrete floors, or satin metal fixtures. Use of raw, unfinished textures is also common, showcasing the inherent beauty of materials in their natural state.

  • The contemporary color palette is primarily neutral, establishing a calm ambiance.

  • Bold, vibrant accents are strategically integrated to create visual interest.

  • Sleek and polished finishes, like high-gloss surfaces, epitomize modern elegance.

  • Raw, unfinished textures, such as exposed brick or wood grain, add depth and character.

  • A harmonious balance between polished and natural finishes is central to the style's ethos.


Contemporary Style Furniture and Decor



Contemporary furniture stands out with its refined simplicity and functional form. Lines are clean, shapes are geometric, and there's a noticeable absence of ornate details. Plush seating, ergonomic designs, and modular systems exemplify the practicality ingrained in the style. Decor in contemporary spaces is often minimal but impactful. Instead of cluttering rooms with numerous items, fewer, well-chosen artwork, sculptures, or designer pieces become focal points.

  • Contemporary furniture boasts clean lines and geometric shapes, devoid of excessive ornamentation.

  • Practicality is key, with a focus on comfort and functional design.

  • Decor is minimalistic, emphasizing quality over quantity.

  • Well-selected artwork or sculptures serve as significant statement pieces within spaces.

  • The overall design approach is intentional, ensuring each item has purpose and contributes to the overall ambiance.


Contemporary Style Lighting



Contemporary lighting fixtures often showcase sleek and unobtrusive designs, blending seamlessly with the surroundings. Recessed and track lighting offer targeted illumination without disrupting the minimalist aesthetic. Pendant lights utilize geometric shapes and industrial materials to become statement pieces over dining tables or kitchen islands. Floor and table lamps, with their sculptural forms, serve both as light sources and decorative elements.

  • Sleek, streamlined fixtures define contemporary lighting, emphasizing minimalism.

  • Recessed and track lighting solutions offer discreet, focused illumination.

  • Pendant lights, often geometric in design, serve as striking focal points in spaces.

  • LED strips and under-cabinet lights create soft ambient lighting and highlight architectural details.

  • Sculptural floor and table lamps merge function with artistic expression.




The American Bungalow Design Style


The American bungalow, though wildly popular, was not always American but was adopted from India in the mid-19th century, where the British built them as simple one-story rest houses for travelers. Unlike other design styles that tend to obey the same rules wherever they are seen, this style conforms to particular communities. For example, Bungalows in California have Spanish touches, in New England, they have British characteristics, and in communities with Dutch roots, they may have gambrel roofs. However, there are staple characteristics that define the American bungalow design style.




American Bungalow Style Architecture



American-bungalow structures showcase their build design very prominently –almost as if they are communicating the original builders' carpentry and design skills. They are also big on maintaining curb appeal on the exterior and, for that reason, will opt for a clean, manicured appearance. The interiors, on the other hand, have finer details. Here are more details:

  • Low-pitched roofs that have eaves or gables.

  • Large front porches shielded from the wind and rain.

  • Expansive fireplaces with built-in cabinets, shelving, and seating for homeowners who love the cabin feel.

  • Exposed rafters that extend outward and may be cut for personal style.

  • Dormers in the front with a gable or shed roof.

  • Double-hung windows with large single glass panes.



American Bungalow Materials



Materials for this style seek to provide a 'home sweet home' feel. They focus on warmth and a casual appeal and steer away from complicated textures. Different regions also tend to have their favorites. For instance, the West loves stucco and clay-tiled roofs. However, the following materials are common in American-bungalow style homes:

  • Clapboard sidings with cedar shingles often with stained wood or another earthy tone

  • Stone, brick, or concrete blocks molded into a decorative form.

  • Accessories made of clay, glass, and wood or unique picks from flea markets to make the space inviting.

  • Rustic, organic designs in seating and furniture achieved with bamboo, wood, grass, and handwoven wicker.



American Bungalow Colors and Finishes



Warmth, giving a cozy, and inviting feel is the underlying theme that dictates the color palette for this style. Exteriors may keep off the traditional brown and white for turquoise, gray-green, or butter yellow. Rugs may be patterned or stick to subdued hues. 

  • Accent walls may be light brown or create a contrast in an earthy-toned room with mustard yellow, sage green, or terra cotta orange.

  • White, soft browns, and shades of blue are excellent color combinations for house exteriors.

  • Woodwork, furniture, moldings, and trim often have a natural finish or are stained to enhance the wood's color.

  • Upholstery and furniture are in shades of beige -khaki, mocha, tan, etc. –to keep the space warm.

  • Metals in gold, chrome, black, brass, silver, and bronze finishes are also common.



American Bungalow Furniture and Decor



American bungalow favors streamlined furniture often made from heavy oak with a dark wood finish. Exposed frames are also common to display the details of their make. Slats, couch arms, and comfortable backs are also common. Here's more:

  • Period furniture depending on the personal taste. Most of them are pieces passed down in a family or unique collectibles bought from a flea market.

  • Large wooden beds with bedposts, storage boxes in the bedroom, and ornate corner tables and seating in the living room

  • Furnished loveseats under windows and sofas for lounging in the living room or on a shielded porch.

  • Decorations come from different cultures, including souvenirs from travel escapades –Moroccan wallpaper, Arabian lamps, wall hangings with tribal drawings, etc.

  • Other wall decorations include murals, or texturing the walls by sponging, ragging, dragging, and stippling.



American Bungalow Lighting



When choosing lighting, most homeowners with an American-bungalow-style home try to mimic their grid windows and geometric or angular arts and crafts designs. It's common to find oil-rubbed finishes with copper or bronze undertones to keep up with this theme in their lighting. Also, large mirrors framed with oak wood may be used to reflect natural daylight in small rooms. Here's more:

  • Lighting may play between subtle and bold.  Large chandeliers light up living and dining rooms.  Lamps are common in bedrooms.

  • Fixtures with a bronze or antique black metal shades.

  • Angular chandeliers or fixtures with square elements 

  • Ceiling fixtures are used in almost every room.




The Art Deco Design Style


Art Deco design, rooted in the flamboyant 1920s and '30s, is an embodiment of luxury, modernity, and bold artistic expression. This design movement was a departure from the ornate Art Nouveau that preceded it, leaning instead towards sleek lines, geometric patterns, and symmetrical forms. The architecture of Art Deco homes often boasted curved facades, fluted pillars, and zigzagged motifs. Interiors were equally striking, with high contrast color schemes, such as black and gold or deep teal and silver.  Art Deco design wasn't just about aesthetics; it was about creating an environment that was simultaneously cutting-edge and comfortable, blending the best of the modern age with undeniable glamour.






Art Deco Architecture



Art Deco residential architecture is celebrated for its sleek geometric designs and ornate embellishments. This style captures an era of innovation and glamour in home design.

  • Streamlined forms and symmetry define Art Deco homes.

  • Facades frequently feature curved corners, zigzags, and sunburst motifs.

  • Materials like chrome, glass, and terracotta add luxurious touches.

  • Strong vertical lines and flat roofs emphasize the modern aesthetic.

  • Stylized motifs, often drawing from global inspirations, enrich architectural details.



Art Deco Materials



Materials played a pivotal role in achieving the characteristic opulence of Art Deco design. Exotic woods like ebony and zebrawood were prevalent, chosen for their rich textures and colors. Stone work was equally exotic, often showcasing immense slabs of heavily veined marbles.  Metals, especially chrome, brass, and stainless steel, introduced a sleek, contemporary dimension, often juxtaposed with the shimmer of glass or mirrored surfaces.

  • Exotic woods, particularly ebony and zebrawood, lent warmth and luxury to Art Deco pieces.

  • Sleek metals like chrome and brass introduced a contemporary flair to designs.

  • Glass and mirrored surfaces were pivotal, reflecting opulence and sophistication.

  • Lacquered finishes and intricate inlays were synonymous with the era's attention to detail.



Art Deco Colors and Finishes



The colors of Art Deco design lean towards juxtaposed hues where soft pastels may be boldly contrasted with deep teals, radiant golds, rich burgundies, and striking blacks. Metallic finishes in gold, silver, and chrome add a touch of modernity, while lacquered surfaces provide a high-gloss, polished look.

  • Pastels contrasted with bold colors or striking blacks

  • Metallic finishes, particularly gold, silver, and chrome

  • Lacquered surfaces, offering a glossy, refined appearance.

  • Mirrored accents and sunburst motifs are signature elements in designs.

  • Exotic materials, such as rare woods and intricate inlays, heighten the style's opulence.



Art Deco Furniture and Decor



Art Deco furniture often showcases streamlined forms with symmetrical designs, crafted from rich woods or plush fabrics and accented with exotic veneers. Bold geometric patterns,  dramatic curvy shapes, and vibrant fabrics define the era's furnishings. Decor items, from mirrors with sunburst motifs to sleek chrome light fixtures, add to the avant-garde design. 

  • Streamlined forms and symmetrical designs are hallmarks of Art Deco furniture.

  • Exotic veneers

  • Geometric patterns and angular shapes feature prominently in both furniture and fabric designs.

  • Decor items often showcase sunburst motifs and gold and chrome accents, reflecting the era's glamour.

  • Craftsmanship was paramount, combining traditional skills with innovative aesthetics.



Art Deco Lighting



Often crafted from sleek materials like chrome, glass, and brass, these fixtures typically feature geometric shapes, layered designs, and frosted or stained glass.  Chandeliers drip with opulence, boasting intricate detailing and bold, angular silhouettes. Wall sconces, with stylized motifs and streamlined forms, illuminate interiors with a sophisticated ambiance, making the space feel cinematic.

  • Sleek metal finishes like chrome, golds, blacks, and glass are staples in Art Deco lighting designs.

  • Geometric shapes and layered designs typify lamps and fixtures.

  • Tiered profiles are iconic of this design.

  • Chandeliers showcase opulence with intricate detailing and bold silhouettes.

  • Interior wall sconces add a touch of elegance to interiors.





The Bohemian Design Style


Bohemian design style, often referred to simply as "Boho," is a vibrant and eclectic approach to residential interior design that celebrates individuality, global influences, and artistic expression. Rooted in the free-spirited ethos of the bohemians — artists, writers, and unconventional thinkers of the late 19th and early 20th centuries — Boho design is characterized by its disregard for strict rules, embracing a mix of colors, patterns, and textures.


Boho spaces are deeply personal, often evolving over time. They tell the stories of their inhabitants, capturing their passions, travels, and experiences. This design style is less about following trends and more about creating a timeless space that resonates with the soul.



Bohemian Style Architecture



Bohemian architecture is not confined to a specific architectural style; rather, it blends various global influences to create a unique and personal aesthetic. Often, Bohemian architectural spaces may lean toward older, rustic structures, such as cottages or lofts, that carry an inherent character. Exposed beams, arched doorways, and mismatched windows might prevail. Outdoor spaces may be seamlessly integrated, blurring the lines between indoor and outdoor living.

  • Bohemian architecture blends diverse global influences.

  • Older, character-rich structures like cottages or lofts are favored.

  • Exposed beams and raw materials showcase a structure's authenticity.

  • Arched doorways and non-uniform windows are common features.

  • Indoor and outdoor spaces merge, emphasizing a holistic living experience.



Bohemian Style Materials



Materials played a pivotal role in achieving the characteristic opulence of Art Deco design. Exotic woods like ebony and zebrawood were prevalent, chosen for their rich textures and colors. Stone work was equally exotic, often showcasing immense slabs of heavily veined marbles.  Metals, especially chrome, brass, and stainless steel, introduced a sleek, contemporary dimension, often juxtaposed with the shimmer of glass or mirrored surfaces.

  • Exotic woods, particularly ebony and zebrawood, lent warmth and luxury to Art Deco pieces.

  • Sleek metals like chrome and brass introduced a contemporary flair to designs.

  • Glass and mirrored surfaces were pivotal, reflecting opulence and sophistication.

  • Lacquered finishes and intricate inlays were synonymous with the era's attention to detail.



Bohemian Style Colors and Finishes



The colors of Art Deco design lean towards juxtaposed hues where soft pastels may be boldly contrasted with deep teals, radiant golds, rich burgundies, and striking blacks. Metallic finishes in gold, silver, and chrome add a touch of modernity, while lacquered surfaces provide a high-gloss, polished look.

  • Pastels contrasted with bold colors or striking blacks

  • Metallic finishes, particularly gold, silver, and chrome

  • Lacquered surfaces, offering a glossy, refined appearance.

  • Mirrored accents and sunburst motifs are signature elements in designs.

  • Exotic materials, such as rare woods and intricate inlays, heighten the style's opulence.



Bohemian Style Furniture and Decor



Art Deco furniture often showcases streamlined forms with symmetrical designs, crafted from rich woods or plush fabrics and accented with exotic veneers. Bold geometric patterns,  dramatic curvy shapes, and vibrant fabrics define the era's furnishings. Decor items, from mirrors with sunburst motifs to sleek chrome light fixtures, add to the avant-garde design. 

  • Streamlined forms and symmetrical designs are hallmarks of Art Deco furniture.

  • Exotic veneers

  • Geometric patterns and angular shapes feature prominently in both furniture and fabric designs.

  • Decor items often showcase sunburst motifs and gold and chrome accents, reflecting the era's glamour.

  • Craftsmanship was paramount, combining traditional skills with innovative aesthetics.



Bohemian Style Lighting



Often crafted from sleek materials like chrome, glass, and brass, these fixtures typically feature geometric shapes, layered designs, and frosted or stained glass.  Chandeliers drip with opulence, boasting intricate detailing and bold, angular silhouettes. Wall sconces, with stylized motifs and streamlined forms, illuminate interiors with a sophisticated ambiance, making the space feel cinematic.

  • Sleek metal finishes like chrome, golds, blacks, and glass are staples in Art Deco lighting designs.

  • Geometric shapes and layered designs typify lamps and fixtures.

  • Tiered profiles are iconic of this design.

  • Chandeliers showcase opulence with intricate detailing and bold silhouettes.

  • Interior wall sconces add a touch of elegance to interiors.





The Americana Design Style


The Americana design style pays homage to the rich tapestry of American heritage, encompassing diverse periods and regional influences. Rooted in nostalgia, this style showcases elements like rustic barn doors, vintage quilts, and repurposed antiques. A color palette of red, white, and blue often features prominently, along with motifs such as stars and stripes. The materials used, like weathered wood and wrought iron, evoke a sense of history and simplicity. However, the Americana style just reference the country's past but celebrates its eclectic nature, blending various elements into a comfortable, cohesive, and uniquely American home environment.




Americana Style Architecture



Americana style residential architecture is a heartfelt nod to American history and heritage. Homes often take cues from various periods, including Colonial, Federal, and Craftsman, resulting in structures that resonate with historical authenticity. This architecture encapsulates the nation's spirit, marrying functionality with a deep-seated reverence for the past.

  • Gabled roofs and wraparound porches are signature features of Americana homes.

  • Traditional materials like clapboard, brick, and stone define exterior facades.

  • Barn-style doors and shutters evoke a rustic, country charm.

  • Interiors often incorporate repurposed antiques, celebrating history and sustainability.

  • The design draws inspiration from various American architectural periods, blending them seamlessly.


Americana Materials



Rooted in nostalgia and simplicity, the primary materials of American design include weathered wood reminiscent of barns and farmhouses. Wrought iron, often seen in hardware and fixtures, adds rustic charm. Natural textiles, such as cotton and wool, feature prominently in upholstery and decor, while brick and stone, used in both interiors and exteriors, provide a sturdy, timeless foundation.

  • Weathered wood is a staple, echoing barns and historical structures.

  • Wrought iron details add authenticity and rustic flair.

  • Natural textiles, like cotton and wool, are favorites for upholstery and decor.

  • Brick and stone form robust, ageless foundations in Americana design.

  • Repurposed antiques are central, celebrating history and sustainability.


Americana Colors and Finishes



Predominant colors include deep reds, blues, and whites, reminiscent of the American flag. Meanwhile, earthy tones like browns, tans, and creams underline its rustic essence.  Antique finishes, especially on wooden furniture, add depth and character. Textiles often showcase vintage patterns and motifs, further enhancing the nostalgic ambiance of the style.

  • Deep reds, blues, and whites dominate, echoing the American flag.

  • Earthy tones, including browns and tans, enhance the rustic vibe.

  • Matte and distressed finishes are preferred for their aged appearance.

  • Antique finishes on wood imbue spaces with historical depth.

  • Vintage patterns and motifs in textiles further define Americana's nostalgic essence.


Americana Furniture and Decor



In essence, Americana design weaves threads of nostalgia, celebrating the nation's journey and the stories of its people through the medium of home interiors. Furniture items often feature sturdy, simplistic constructions reminiscent of early colonial and farmhouse styles. Weathered wood, handcrafted details, and repurposed antiques are central to the Americana aesthetic. Decorative items, such as vintage quilts, folk art, and patriotic motifs, punctuate interiors with a sense of history and place.

  • Sturdy, simplistic furniture echoes colonial and farmhouse origins.

  • Weathered wood and handcrafted details dominate Americana furnishings.

  • Repurposed antiques add both functionality and historical resonance.

  • Vintage quilts and folk art serve as quintessential decorative elements.

  • Patriotic motifs, from stars to stripes, are frequently showcased in the decor.


Americana Lighting



Americana design lighting fixtures are an ode to simpler times, marrying functionality with understated beauty. These fixtures often draw from colonial, farmhouse, and rustic inspirations. Lantern-style pendants, evoking the early days of American history, are a staple. Chandeliers or sconces with weathered finishes add a touch of rustic charm. Table lamps might feature bases resembling antiques.  The point is to embrace the country's heritage, illuminating your home with warmth and historical resonance.

  • Lantern-style pendants are emblematic of early American history.

  • Wrought iron finishes exude rustic elegance.

  • Table lamps often incorporate antique designs or Americana motifs.

  • Mason jar lights reflect the style's grassroots charm.

  • Candle-inspired fixtures provide a nod to pre-electricity eras.




The American Bungalow Design Style


The American bungalow, though wildly popular, was not always American but was adopted from India in the mid-19th century, where the British built them as simple one-story rest houses for travelers. Unlike other design styles that tend to obey the same rules wherever they are seen, this style conforms to particular communities. For example, Bungalows in California have Spanish touches, in New England, they have British characteristics, and in communities with Dutch roots, they may have gambrel roofs. However, there are staple characteristics that define the American bungalow design style.




American Bungalow Style Architecture



American-bungalow structures showcase their build design very prominently –almost as if they are communicating the original builders' carpentry and design skills. They are also big on maintaining curb appeal on the exterior and, for that reason, will opt for a clean, manicured appearance. The interiors, on the other hand, have finer details. Here are more details:

  • Low-pitched roofs that have eaves or gables.

  • Large front porches shielded from the wind and rain.

  • Expansive fireplaces with built-in cabinets, shelving, and seating for homeowners who love the cabin feel.

  • Exposed rafters that extend outward and may be cut for personal style.

  • Dormers in the front with a gable or shed roof.

  • Double-hung windows with large single glass panes.



American Bungalow Materials



Materials for this style seek to provide a 'home sweet home' feel. They focus on warmth and a casual appeal and steer away from complicated textures. Different regions also tend to have their favorites. For instance, the West loves stucco and clay-tiled roofs. However, the following materials are common in American-bungalow style homes:

  • Clapboard sidings with cedar shingles often with stained wood or another earthy tone

  • Stone, brick, or concrete blocks molded into a decorative form.

  • Accessories made of clay, glass, and wood or unique picks from flea markets to make the space inviting.

  • Rustic, organic designs in seating and furniture achieved with bamboo, wood, grass, and handwoven wicker.



American Bungalow Colors and Finishes



Warmth, giving a cozy, and inviting feel is the underlying theme that dictates the color palette for this style. Exteriors may keep off the traditional brown and white for turquoise, gray-green, or butter yellow. Rugs may be patterned or stick to subdued hues. 

  • Accent walls may be light brown or create a contrast in an earthy-toned room with mustard yellow, sage green, or terra cotta orange.

  • White, soft browns, and shades of blue are excellent color combinations for house exteriors.

  • Woodwork, furniture, moldings, and trim often have a natural finish or are stained to enhance the wood's color.

  • Upholstery and furniture are in shades of beige -khaki, mocha, tan, etc. –to keep the space warm.

  • Metals in gold, chrome, black, brass, silver, and bronze finishes are also common.



American Bungalow Furniture and Decor



American bungalow favors streamlined furniture often made from heavy oak with a dark wood finish. Exposed frames are also common to display the details of their make. Slats, couch arms, and comfortable backs are also common. Here's more:

  • Period furniture depending on the personal taste. Most of them are pieces passed down in a family or unique collectibles bought from a flea market.

  • Large wooden beds with bedposts, storage boxes in the bedroom, and ornate corner tables and seating in the living room

  • Furnished loveseats under windows and sofas for lounging in the living room or on a shielded porch.

  • Decorations come from different cultures, including souvenirs from travel escapades –Moroccan wallpaper, Arabian lamps, wall hangings with tribal drawings, etc.

  • Other wall decorations include murals, or texturing the walls by sponging, ragging, dragging, and stippling.



American Bungalow Lighting



When choosing lighting, most homeowners with an American-bungalow-style home try to mimic their grid windows and geometric or angular arts and crafts designs. It's common to find oil-rubbed finishes with copper or bronze undertones to keep up with this theme in their lighting. Also, large mirrors framed with oak wood may be used to reflect natural daylight in small rooms. Here's more:

  • Lighting may play between subtle and bold.  Large chandeliers light up living and dining rooms.  Lamps are common in bedrooms.

  • Fixtures with a bronze or antique black metal shades.

  • Angular chandeliers or fixtures with square elements 

  • Ceiling fixtures are used in almost every room.




The Art Deco Design Style


Art Deco design, rooted in the flamboyant 1920s and '30s, is an embodiment of luxury, modernity, and bold artistic expression. This design movement was a departure from the ornate Art Nouveau that preceded it, leaning instead towards sleek lines, geometric patterns, and symmetrical forms. The architecture of Art Deco homes often boasted curved facades, fluted pillars, and zigzagged motifs. Interiors were equally striking, with high contrast color schemes, such as black and gold or deep teal and silver.  Art Deco design wasn't just about aesthetics; it was about creating an environment that was simultaneously cutting-edge and comfortable, blending the best of the modern age with undeniable glamour.






Art Deco Architecture



Art Deco residential architecture is celebrated for its sleek geometric designs and ornate embellishments. This style captures an era of innovation and glamour in home design.

  • Streamlined forms and symmetry define Art Deco homes.

  • Facades frequently feature curved corners, zigzags, and sunburst motifs.

  • Materials like chrome, glass, and terracotta add luxurious touches.

  • Strong vertical lines and flat roofs emphasize the modern aesthetic.

  • Stylized motifs, often drawing from global inspirations, enrich architectural details.



Art Deco Materials



Materials played a pivotal role in achieving the characteristic opulence of Art Deco design. Exotic woods like ebony and zebrawood were prevalent, chosen for their rich textures and colors. Stone work was equally exotic, often showcasing immense slabs of heavily veined marbles.  Metals, especially chrome, brass, and stainless steel, introduced a sleek, contemporary dimension, often juxtaposed with the shimmer of glass or mirrored surfaces.

  • Exotic woods, particularly ebony and zebrawood, lent warmth and luxury to Art Deco pieces.

  • Sleek metals like chrome and brass introduced a contemporary flair to designs.

  • Glass and mirrored surfaces were pivotal, reflecting opulence and sophistication.

  • Lacquered finishes and intricate inlays were synonymous with the era's attention to detail.



Art Deco Colors and Finishes



The colors of Art Deco design lean towards juxtaposed hues where soft pastels may be boldly contrasted with deep teals, radiant golds, rich burgundies, and striking blacks. Metallic finishes in gold, silver, and chrome add a touch of modernity, while lacquered surfaces provide a high-gloss, polished look.

  • Pastels contrasted with bold colors or striking blacks

  • Metallic finishes, particularly gold, silver, and chrome

  • Lacquered surfaces, offering a glossy, refined appearance.

  • Mirrored accents and sunburst motifs are signature elements in designs.

  • Exotic materials, such as rare woods and intricate inlays, heighten the style's opulence.



Art Deco Furniture and Decor



Art Deco furniture often showcases streamlined forms with symmetrical designs, crafted from rich woods or plush fabrics and accented with exotic veneers. Bold geometric patterns,  dramatic curvy shapes, and vibrant fabrics define the era's furnishings. Decor items, from mirrors with sunburst motifs to sleek chrome light fixtures, add to the avant-garde design. 

  • Streamlined forms and symmetrical designs are hallmarks of Art Deco furniture.

  • Exotic veneers

  • Geometric patterns and angular shapes feature prominently in both furniture and fabric designs.

  • Decor items often showcase sunburst motifs and gold and chrome accents, reflecting the era's glamour.

  • Craftsmanship was paramount, combining traditional skills with innovative aesthetics.



Art Deco Lighting



Often crafted from sleek materials like chrome, glass, and brass, these fixtures typically feature geometric shapes, layered designs, and frosted or stained glass.  Chandeliers drip with opulence, boasting intricate detailing and bold, angular silhouettes. Wall sconces, with stylized motifs and streamlined forms, illuminate interiors with a sophisticated ambiance, making the space feel cinematic.

  • Sleek metal finishes like chrome, golds, blacks, and glass are staples in Art Deco lighting designs.

  • Geometric shapes and layered designs typify lamps and fixtures.

  • Tiered profiles are iconic of this design.

  • Chandeliers showcase opulence with intricate detailing and bold silhouettes.

  • Interior wall sconces add a touch of elegance to interiors.





The Bohemian Design Style


Bohemian design style, often referred to simply as "Boho," is a vibrant and eclectic approach to residential interior design that celebrates individuality, global influences, and artistic expression. Rooted in the free-spirited ethos of the bohemians — artists, writers, and unconventional thinkers of the late 19th and early 20th centuries — Boho design is characterized by its disregard for strict rules, embracing a mix of colors, patterns, and textures.


Boho spaces are deeply personal, often evolving over time. They tell the stories of their inhabitants, capturing their passions, travels, and experiences. This design style is less about following trends and more about creating a timeless space that resonates with the soul.



Bohemian Style Architecture



Bohemian architecture blends various global influences to create a unique and personal aesthetic. Often, Bohemian architectural spaces may lean toward older, rustic structures, such as cottages or lofts, that carry an inherent character. Exposed beams, arched doorways, and mismatched windows might prevail. Outdoor spaces may be seamlessly integrated, blurring the lines between indoor and outdoor living.

  • Bohemian architecture blends diverse global influences.

  • Older, character-rich structures like cottages or lofts are favored.

  • Exposed beams and raw materials showcase a structure's authenticity.

  • Arched doorways and non-uniform windows are common features.

  • Indoor and outdoor spaces merge, emphasizing a holistic living experience.



Bohemian Style Materials



Materials commonly used in Bohemian designs include natural textiles like cotton, linen, and silk. Rich velvets and brocades can also be found, juxtaposed with rustic materials like burlap and hemp. Vintage fabrics, often with ethnic or floral patterns, play a crucial role. Wood, especially in its raw or distressed form, is a preferred choice for furniture. Additionally, woven materials, like rattan and bamboo, add texture and depth.

  • Bohemian designs favor natural textiles such as cotton, linen, and silk.

  • Rich velvets and brocades often feature prominently in Boho interiors.

  • Rustic materials, including burlap and hemp, provide an earthy touch.

  • Vintage fabrics, showcasing ethnic or floral motifs, are frequently incorporated.



Bohemian Style Colors and Finishes



Warm shades of terracotta, deep browns, and olive greens frequently lay the foundation of the Bohemian style. These are accented with pops of turquoise, magenta, and golden yellow. Multiple colors are layered to create an effortlessly eclectic ambiance. Distressed or matte finishes often dominate to give a worn, lived-in look. Moreover, touches of shimmer, whether as metallic accents or sequined textiles, add depth and interest.

  • Earthy tones like terracotta, deep browns, and olive greens are foundational in Bohemian color schemes.

  • Bright accents, including turquoise, magenta, and golden yellow, vivify the design.

  • The Bohemian palette confidently layers multiple colors, ensuring an eclectic blend.

  • Distressed or matte finishes are prevalent, lending a vintage and lived-in feel.

  • Occasional shimmer, through metallics or sequins, punctuates the Boho look with unexpected shine.



Bohemian Style Furniture and Decor



Furniture pieces in boho settings tend to have a vintage, or antique, feel. Low-lying furniture, such as floor cushions and poufs, invite relaxed lounging. Textured elements like macramé wall hangings, patterned rugs, and tasseled throws abound. Open shelving filled with a collection of global trinkets, plants, and books also embodies the free-spirited nature of the style. Bohemian decor exploits the unexpected - fusing together items from various cultures, eras, and design philosophies.

  • Bohemian furniture often exudes a vintage or antique character.

  • Low-lying furniture pieces, like floor cushions and poufs, promote a laid-back atmosphere.

  • Textural decor elements, including macramé and tasseled throws, are hallmarks of Boho style.

  • Open shelving showcases an eclectic mix of trinkets, plants, and literature.

  • The Boho decor approach celebrates the fusion of diverse cultures, eras, and design philosophies.



Bohemian Style Lighting



Lighting in Bohemian designs is an essential element that evokes warmth, intimacy, and artistic flair. Ambient, soft-glowing lights often set the mood, with lanterns, fairy lights, and candles creating a dreamy atmosphere. Hanging pendants made of natural materials like rattan or macramé, and intricate metal chandeliers with an antique finish, are popular choices. Floor and table lamps, draped with vintage textiles or adorned with beading, add personality and character.

  • Ambient lighting, including lanterns and fairy lights, infuses a dreamy, warm ambiance.

  • Hanging pendants crafted from natural materials, like rattan or macramé, are quintessential Boho fixtures.

  • Metal chandeliers with antique finishes enhance the vintage vibe of the space.

  • Floor and table lamps often feature decorative elements like vintage textiles or beading.

  • Colored or stained-glass fixtures introduce whimsy and a touch of historic nostalgia.





The Casual Design Style


Casual design style in residential interior design emphasizes comfort, relaxation, and a welcoming ambiance. Often viewed as the antithesis of formal, stuffy interiors, casual design champions the lived-in look. It's the embodiment of an environment where shoes are kicked off, laughs are shared, and memories are made. 

In essence, casual design resonates with homeowners who want their space to be a reflection of their lives – unpretentious, inviting, and replete with personal touches that make a house truly feel like a home.


Casual Style Architecture



Casual design architecture often embody a sense of warmth and approachability. Pitched roofs, expansive windows, and open floor plans are common, inviting natural light and fostering connection between spaces. Exteriors may feature wood or stone while the interior boasts exposed beams, fireplaces, and built-in shelves. The overall intention in casual architecture is to craft a space that facilitates ease, flow, and the simple joys of daily living.

  • Casual architecture prioritizes functionality, comfort, and an unpretentious aesthetic.

  • Pitched roofs, expansive windows, and open floor plans create a welcoming environment.

  • Natural materials like wood and stone are often used, aligning the home with nature.

  • Interior details such as exposed beams, fireplaces, and built-ins contribute to the homey feel.

  • The design encourages ease, flow, and the celebration of everyday moments.


Casual Style Materials



Woods, in their various tones and finishes, are staples, whether for flooring, cabinetry, or furniture. Soft, breathable textiles like cotton and linen grace upholstery, curtains, and throws. Stone, either as countertops or fireplace surrounds, adds texture and an earthy feel. Wicker and rattan may make appearances in furnishings, bringing in a tactile, organic touch. Lastly, metal accents, particularly in aged or brushed finishes, impart subtle hints of industrial charm in the relaxed ambiance.

  • Woods are fundamental in casual design, used in furniture, flooring, and cabinetry.

  • Breathable textiles like cotton and linen enhance the comfort and airiness of spaces.

  • Stone elements introduce texture and an earthy, grounded presence.

  • Wicker and rattan furnishings add an organic, tactile dimension to the decor.

  • Metal accents, especially in aged or brushed finishes, provide a balanced, slightly industrial touch.


Casual Style Colors and Finishes



Soft beiges, creams, muted blues, and gentle greens often serve as the base. However, the design doesn't shy away from integrating subtle pops of warmer or brighter hues, especially through accents. The finishes in casual interiors are typically matte or subtly distressed, echoing the unpretentious vibe of the style. Wood finishes, for instance, might appear naturally weathered or lightly whitewashed.

  • A neutral palette, featuring beiges, creams, and soft blues, dominates casual designs.

  • Subtle pops of color can be introduced through accents for added warmth.

  • Matte finishes underscore the relaxed and understated appeal of the style.

  • Distressed or weathered elements, especially in wood, add character and depth.

  • The color and finish choices aim for an accessible, timeless, and homey atmosphere.


Casual Style Furniture and Decor



Casual furniture and decor underscore comfort and functionality while evoking a welcoming, homey vibe. Furniture pieces, often with soft lines and rounded edges, prioritize comfort — think plush sofas, cushioned armchairs, and functional coffee tables. The fabrics used are typically soft and breathable, inviting relaxation. Decor is understated, with an emphasis on personal touches like family photos, travel mementos, or cherished books. Shelves might display a mix of decorative pieces and practical items, reflecting the homeowner's personal journey. 

  • Casual furniture is characterized by soft lines, rounded edges, and a focus on comfort.

  • Fabrics in casual designs are soft, breathable, and inviting, enhancing the comfort factor.

  • Personal touches, like family photos and mementos, are central to casual decor.

  • Decorative and practical items often share space, reflecting a genuine lived-in atmosphere.

  • The overarching aim is to craft spaces that feel both personal and universally welcoming.


Casual Style Lighting



Casual lighting fixtures prioritize functionality while enhancing a relaxed, inviting ambiance of the space. Ambient lighting, often sourced from recessed lights or flush-mount fixtures, ensures rooms are well-lit without being overpowering. Pendant lights, often in muted tones or natural materials, can hang over dining tables or kitchen islands. Table and floor lamps with fabric shades bring warmth to corners and reading nooks. The use of lanterns or candleholders adds a touch of cozy, diffused lighting.

  • Ambient lighting from recessed or flush-mount fixtures provides a soft, general illumination.

  • Pendant lights, especially in natural materials, accent dining or kitchen areas

  • Table and floor lamps with fabric shades contribute to the cozy ambiance.

  • Lanterns and candleholders offer additional layers of warm, diffused light.

  • Casual lighting fixtures balance functionality with understated decorative elements.




The Classic Design Style


The Classic design style in residential interior design epitomizes timelessness, elegance, and symmetry. Rooted in European sensibilities, it draws inspiration from ancient Greek, Roman, and Renaissance architecture and decor. The hallmark of the classic style is its emphasis on proportion and balance, ensuring every element harmonizes with its surroundings.

While classic design tends to be more formal and structured than some contemporary styles, it’s not stiff or unapproachable. Instead, it provides a sense of stability, longevity, and an undying appreciation for beauty and craftsmanship, making homes feel both grand and inviting.


Classic Style Architecture



Classic architecture often draws inspiration from historical periods, particularly Greek, Roman, and Renaissance architecture. The facades typically showcase grand columns, intricate cornices, and detailed moldings. Windows are often evenly spaced and adorned with shutters or decorative trims. Interiors might feature high ceilings, archways, and coffered detailing. Throughout, there's a consistent emphasis on proportion and order, resulting in homes that feel both majestic and timeless.

  • Classic architecture is rooted in Greek, Roman, and Renaissance influences.

  • Symmetry and balance are paramount, both in exterior facades and interior layouts.

  • Grand columns, intricate cornices, and detailed moldings exemplify the style's refined aesthetics.

  • Evenly spaced windows, often adorned with shutters or trims, contribute to the architectural harmony.

  • High ceilings, archways, and coffered details enhance the interior's grandeur.



Classic Style Materials



Materials for this style seek to provide a 'home sweet home' feel. They focus on warmth and a casual appeal and steer away from complicated textures. Different regions also tend to have their favorites. For instance, the West loves stucco and clay-tiled roofs. However, the following materials are common in American-bungalow style homes:

  • Clapboard sidings with cedar shingles often with stained wood or another earthy tone

  • Stone, brick, or concrete blocks molded into a decorative form.

  • Accessories made of clay, glass, and wood or unique picks from flea markets to make the space inviting.

  • Rustic, organic designs in seating and furniture achieved with bamboo, wood, grass, and handwoven wicker.



Classic Style Colors and Finishes



Warmth, giving a cozy, and inviting feel is the underlying theme that dictates the color palette for this style. Exteriors may keep off the traditional brown and white for turquoise, gray-green, or butter yellow. Rugs may be patterned or stick to subdued hues. 

  • Accent walls may be light brown or create a contrast in an earthy-toned room with mustard yellow, sage green, or terra cotta orange.

  • White, soft browns, and shades of blue are excellent color combinations for house exteriors.

  • Woodwork, furniture, moldings, and trim often have a natural finish or are stained to enhance the wood's color.

  • Upholstery and furniture are in shades of beige -khaki, mocha, tan, etc. –to keep the space warm.

  • Metals in gold, chrome, black, brass, silver, and bronze finishes are also common.



Classic Style Furniture and Decor



American bungalow favors streamlined furniture often made from heavy oak with a dark wood finish. Exposed frames are also common to display the details of their make. Slats, couch arms, and comfortable backs are also common. Here's more:

  • Period furniture depending on the personal taste. Most of them are pieces passed down in a family or unique collectibles bought from a flea market.

  • Large wooden beds with bedposts, storage boxes in the bedroom, and ornate corner tables and seating in the living room

  • Furnished loveseats under windows and sofas for lounging in the living room or on a shielded porch.

  • Decorations come from different cultures, including souvenirs from travel escapades –Moroccan wallpaper, Arabian lamps, wall hangings with tribal drawings, etc.

  • Other wall decorations include murals, or texturing the walls by sponging, ragging, dragging, and stippling.



Classic Style Lighting



When choosing lighting, most homeowners with an American-bungalow-style home try to mimic their grid windows and geometric or angular arts and crafts designs. It's common to find oil-rubbed finishes with copper or bronze undertones to keep up with this theme in their lighting. Also, large mirrors framed with oak wood may be used to reflect natural daylight in small rooms. Here's more:

  • Lighting may play between subtle and bold.  Large chandeliers light up living and dining rooms.  Lamps are common in bedrooms.

  • Fixtures with a bronze or antique black metal shades.

  • Angular chandeliers or fixtures with square elements 

  • Ceiling fixtures are used in almost every room.




The Art Deco Design Style


Art Deco design, rooted in the flamboyant 1920s and '30s, is an embodiment of luxury, modernity, and bold artistic expression. This design movement was a departure from the ornate Art Nouveau that preceded it, leaning instead towards sleek lines, geometric patterns, and symmetrical forms. The architecture of Art Deco homes often boasted curved facades, fluted pillars, and zigzagged motifs. Interiors were equally striking, with high contrast color schemes, such as black and gold or deep teal and silver.  Art Deco design wasn't just about aesthetics; it was about creating an environment that was simultaneously cutting-edge and comfortable, blending the best of the modern age with undeniable glamour.






Art Deco Architecture



Art Deco residential architecture is celebrated for its sleek geometric designs and ornate embellishments. This style captures an era of innovation and glamour in home design.

  • Streamlined forms and symmetry define Art Deco homes.

  • Facades frequently feature curved corners, zigzags, and sunburst motifs.

  • Materials like chrome, glass, and terracotta add luxurious touches.

  • Strong vertical lines and flat roofs emphasize the modern aesthetic.

  • Stylized motifs, often drawing from global inspirations, enrich architectural details.



Art Deco Materials



Materials played a pivotal role in achieving the characteristic opulence of Art Deco design. Exotic woods like ebony and zebrawood were prevalent, chosen for their rich textures and colors. Stone work was equally exotic, often showcasing immense slabs of heavily veined marbles.  Metals, especially chrome, brass, and stainless steel, introduced a sleek, contemporary dimension, often juxtaposed with the shimmer of glass or mirrored surfaces.

  • Exotic woods, particularly ebony and zebrawood, lent warmth and luxury to Art Deco pieces.

  • Sleek metals like chrome and brass introduced a contemporary flair to designs.

  • Glass and mirrored surfaces were pivotal, reflecting opulence and sophistication.

  • Lacquered finishes and intricate inlays were synonymous with the era's attention to detail.



Art Deco Colors and Finishes



The colors of Art Deco design lean towards juxtaposed hues where soft pastels may be boldly contrasted with deep teals, radiant golds, rich burgundies, and striking blacks. Metallic finishes in gold, silver, and chrome add a touch of modernity, while lacquered surfaces provide a high-gloss, polished look.

  • Pastels contrasted with bold colors or striking blacks

  • Metallic finishes, particularly gold, silver, and chrome

  • Lacquered surfaces, offering a glossy, refined appearance.

  • Mirrored accents and sunburst motifs are signature elements in designs.

  • Exotic materials, such as rare woods and intricate inlays, heighten the style's opulence.



Art Deco Furniture and Decor



Art Deco furniture often showcases streamlined forms with symmetrical designs, crafted from rich woods or plush fabrics and accented with exotic veneers. Bold geometric patterns,  dramatic curvy shapes, and vibrant fabrics define the era's furnishings. Decor items, from mirrors with sunburst motifs to sleek chrome light fixtures, add to the avant-garde design. 

  • Streamlined forms and symmetrical designs are hallmarks of Art Deco furniture.

  • Exotic veneers

  • Geometric patterns and angular shapes feature prominently in both furniture and fabric designs.

  • Decor items often showcase sunburst motifs and gold and chrome accents, reflecting the era's glamour.

  • Craftsmanship was paramount, combining traditional skills with innovative aesthetics.



Art Deco Lighting



Often crafted from sleek materials like chrome, glass, and brass, these fixtures typically feature geometric shapes, layered designs, and frosted or stained glass.  Chandeliers drip with opulence, boasting intricate detailing and bold, angular silhouettes. Wall sconces, with stylized motifs and streamlined forms, illuminate interiors with a sophisticated ambiance, making the space feel cinematic.

  • Sleek metal finishes like chrome, golds, blacks, and glass are staples in Art Deco lighting designs.

  • Geometric shapes and layered designs typify lamps and fixtures.

  • Tiered profiles are iconic of this design.

  • Chandeliers showcase opulence with intricate detailing and bold silhouettes.

  • Interior wall sconces add a touch of elegance to interiors.





The Bohemian Design Style


Bohemian design style, often referred to simply as "Boho," is a vibrant and eclectic approach to residential interior design that celebrates individuality, global influences, and artistic expression. Rooted in the free-spirited ethos of the bohemians — artists, writers, and unconventional thinkers of the late 19th and early 20th centuries — Boho design is characterized by its disregard for strict rules, embracing a mix of colors, patterns, and textures.


Boho spaces are deeply personal, often evolving over time. They tell the stories of their inhabitants, capturing their passions, travels, and experiences. This design style is less about following trends and more about creating a timeless space that resonates with the soul.



Bohemian Style Architecture



Bohemian architecture is not confined to a specific architectural style; rather, it blends various global influences to create a unique and personal aesthetic. Often, Bohemian architectural spaces may lean toward older, rustic structures, such as cottages or lofts, that carry an inherent character. Exposed beams, arched doorways, and mismatched windows might prevail. Outdoor spaces may be seamlessly integrated, blurring the lines between indoor and outdoor living.

  • Bohemian architecture blends diverse global influences.

  • Older, character-rich structures like cottages or lofts are favored.

  • Exposed beams and raw materials showcase a structure's authenticity.

  • Arched doorways and non-uniform windows are common features.

  • Indoor and outdoor spaces merge, emphasizing a holistic living experience.



Bohemian Style Materials



Materials played a pivotal role in achieving the characteristic opulence of Art Deco design. Exotic woods like ebony and zebrawood were prevalent, chosen for their rich textures and colors. Stone work was equally exotic, often showcasing immense slabs of heavily veined marbles.  Metals, especially chrome, brass, and stainless steel, introduced a sleek, contemporary dimension, often juxtaposed with the shimmer of glass or mirrored surfaces.

  • Exotic woods, particularly ebony and zebrawood, lent warmth and luxury to Art Deco pieces.

  • Sleek metals like chrome and brass introduced a contemporary flair to designs.

  • Glass and mirrored surfaces were pivotal, reflecting opulence and sophistication.

  • Lacquered finishes and intricate inlays were synonymous with the era's attention to detail.



Bohemian Style Colors and Finishes



The colors of Art Deco design lean towards juxtaposed hues where soft pastels may be boldly contrasted with deep teals, radiant golds, rich burgundies, and striking blacks. Metallic finishes in gold, silver, and chrome add a touch of modernity, while lacquered surfaces provide a high-gloss, polished look.

  • Pastels contrasted with bold colors or striking blacks

  • Metallic finishes, particularly gold, silver, and chrome

  • Lacquered surfaces, offering a glossy, refined appearance.

  • Mirrored accents and sunburst motifs are signature elements in designs.

  • Exotic materials, such as rare woods and intricate inlays, heighten the style's opulence.



Bohemian Style Furniture and Decor



Art Deco furniture often showcases streamlined forms with symmetrical designs, crafted from rich woods or plush fabrics and accented with exotic veneers. Bold geometric patterns,  dramatic curvy shapes, and vibrant fabrics define the era's furnishings. Decor items, from mirrors with sunburst motifs to sleek chrome light fixtures, add to the avant-garde design. 

  • Streamlined forms and symmetrical designs are hallmarks of Art Deco furniture.

  • Exotic veneers

  • Geometric patterns and angular shapes feature prominently in both furniture and fabric designs.

  • Decor items often showcase sunburst motifs and gold and chrome accents, reflecting the era's glamour.

  • Craftsmanship was paramount, combining traditional skills with innovative aesthetics.



Bohemian Style Lighting



Often crafted from sleek materials like chrome, glass, and brass, these fixtures typically feature geometric shapes, layered designs, and frosted or stained glass.  Chandeliers drip with opulence, boasting intricate detailing and bold, angular silhouettes. Wall sconces, with stylized motifs and streamlined forms, illuminate interiors with a sophisticated ambiance, making the space feel cinematic.

  • Sleek metal finishes like chrome, golds, blacks, and glass are staples in Art Deco lighting designs.

  • Geometric shapes and layered designs typify lamps and fixtures.

  • Tiered profiles are iconic of this design.

  • Chandeliers showcase opulence with intricate detailing and bold silhouettes.

  • Interior wall sconces add a touch of elegance to interiors.





The Americana Design Style


The Americana design style pays homage to the rich tapestry of American heritage, encompassing diverse periods and regional influences. Rooted in nostalgia, this style showcases elements like rustic barn doors, vintage quilts, and repurposed antiques. A color palette of red, white, and blue often features prominently, along with motifs such as stars and stripes. The materials used, like weathered wood and wrought iron, evoke a sense of history and simplicity. However, the Americana style just reference the country's past but celebrates its eclectic nature, blending various elements into a comfortable, cohesive, and uniquely American home environment.




Americana Style Architecture



Americana style residential architecture is a heartfelt nod to American history and heritage. Homes often take cues from various periods, including Colonial, Federal, and Craftsman, resulting in structures that resonate with historical authenticity. This architecture encapsulates the nation's spirit, marrying functionality with a deep-seated reverence for the past.

  • Gabled roofs and wraparound porches are signature features of Americana homes.

  • Traditional materials like clapboard, brick, and stone define exterior facades.

  • Barn-style doors and shutters evoke a rustic, country charm.

  • Interiors often incorporate repurposed antiques, celebrating history and sustainability.

  • The design draws inspiration from various American architectural periods, blending them seamlessly.


Americana Materials



Rooted in nostalgia and simplicity, the primary materials of American design include weathered wood reminiscent of barns and farmhouses. Wrought iron, often seen in hardware and fixtures, adds rustic charm. Natural textiles, such as cotton and wool, feature prominently in upholstery and decor, while brick and stone, used in both interiors and exteriors, provide a sturdy, timeless foundation.

  • Weathered wood is a staple, echoing barns and historical structures.

  • Wrought iron details add authenticity and rustic flair.

  • Natural textiles, like cotton and wool, are favorites for upholstery and decor.

  • Brick and stone form robust, ageless foundations in Americana design.

  • Repurposed antiques are central, celebrating history and sustainability.


Americana Colors and Finishes



Predominant colors include deep reds, blues, and whites, reminiscent of the American flag. Meanwhile, earthy tones like browns, tans, and creams underline its rustic essence.  Antique finishes, especially on wooden furniture, add depth and character. Textiles often showcase vintage patterns and motifs, further enhancing the nostalgic ambiance of the style.

  • Deep reds, blues, and whites dominate, echoing the American flag.

  • Earthy tones, including browns and tans, enhance the rustic vibe.